McDonald’s Purchases Renewable Power

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The energy generated for the virtual power purchase agreement will be equivalent to 1,300 McDonald’s restaurants' worth of electricity.

McDonald’s Purchases Renewable Power

11/11/2019

McDonald’s, Apex Clean Energy, and Ares Management Corporation’s Infrastructure and Power strategy, announced a 220 MW virtual renewable power purchase agreement (PPA) between McDonald’s and Aviator Wind West, a portion of the Aviator Wind project located in Coke County, Texas.

The virtual PPA, negotiated by Ares Management and Apex, represents the first wind energy contract signed by McDonald’s and will help the iconic company make strides toward its Climate Action Target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions related to McDonald’s restaurants and offices by 36% by 2030. The agreement with Aviator Wind West, together with a virtual solar power purchase agreement, positions McDonald’s to add more renewable energy to the grid than any other U.S. restaurant company to date.

“As we look at the most pressing social and environmental challenges facing the world today, McDonald’s has a responsibility to take action, and our customers expect us to do what is right for the planet,” said Francesca DeBiase, chief supply chain and sustainability officer, McDonald’s. “This U.S. wind project represents a significant step in our work to address climate change, building on years of renewable energy sourcing in many of our European markets. We want to keep this momentum going, and we’re excited for what’s next.”

The energy generated for the virtual power purchase agreement will be equivalent to 1,300 McDonald’s restaurants' worth of electricity.

Apex Clean Energy will provide both construction and asset management services for the project, which will be operational in 2020. The project will create approximately 300 short-term construction jobs and at least nine long-term operations positions, as well as generate approximately $140 million in tax revenue for the local economy.